Anecdotas del "Principe de los Tenores"
 
Franco Corelli "Principe de los Tenores" 2ºparte
Anecdotas del "Principe de los Tenores"
Franco Corelli
"El tenor de Oro"
Dario Corelli: es mi nombre real
Entrevista a Franco Corelli
franco corelli
CORELLI, el Ultimo Tenor Heroico
"Celebrando a Corelli" Marzo 12, 2004, en el Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center, NY

Anecdotas del "Principe de los Tenores"

Imagen
Franco Corelli: Tempestuous Tenor

Franco Corelli was as famed for his mercurial nature as he was for his remarkable voice. "Being heckled or out-sung enraged him. When someone booed him during a performance of 'Il Trovatore' in Naples, he left the stage and ran up three flights of stairs to throw himself on his tormentor... A partnership with Boris Christoff in 'Don Carlos' ended prematurely when the two, using their stage swords, tried actually to kill each other in the auto da fé scene."
Franco Corelli: Prima Donna

"Franco Corelli, one of the greatest tenors of his age, was also one of the most demanding. He insisted on steak tartare, well garnished with lemon and raw garlic, before his performances. He expected to be greeted at airports with appropriate honour, and once abandoned a season at the Paris Opera because there was no red carpet at Charles de Gaulle."

Franco Corelli: Backstage Spat

"Franco Corelli, one of the greatest tenors of his age, was also one of the most demanding. He insisted on steak tartare, well garnished with lemon and raw garlic, before his performances... At the New York Met, during the 1964 season, he delayed his entry in 'Don Carlos' for several minutes in order to win a backstage spat with his wife."
imagen
imagen
imagen
Franco Corelli & Birgit Nilsson

"During a performance of Turandot [in 1961], the tenor Franco Corelli, after having been thoroughly out-shouted in 'In questa reggia' [by Birgit Nilsson, who had held her top C much longer than he had], immediately left the stage (he had no more to sing, but he was supposed to be there), sulked in his dressing room, and declared that he would not come out again.
"At this point, Rudolf Bing [the Met's manager] is said to have entered the dressing room [and found Corelli, his wife, and the dog all screaming, and blood on the table which he had smashed in a rage] with an idea wonderfully calculated to appeal to the tenor's amour propre. 'In America, a man cannot retreat before a woman,' Mr. Bing is reported to have said. 'Continue! And in the last act, when the time comes to kiss her, bite her instead.'

"Mr. Corelli is said to have followed instructions, and Mr. Bing, according to the story, fled to New York, where Miss Nilsson telephoned him, saying, 'I cannot go on to Cleveland. I have rabies!'"

Imagen
Imagen
Franco Corelli & Rudolph Bing

"Rudolph Bing, the Met's flamboyant manager, always said he had to talk to Mr Corelli first and sign him last, since weeks would pass while the star agonised. On one occasion, Bing had to persuade him to replace Carlo Bergonzi at short notice. He and a colleague went to Mr Corelli's room, only to pick the wrong one; an astonished elderly woman opened the door to find the two of them kneeling on the floor before her
imagen
imagen